Archives for the month of: March, 2012

What do you think is the best answer to this Text Completion question?

Just as reminiscences of a childhood spent in rural Mexico color the poet’s work, so too does the experience of war __________ her poetry.

inform
mimic
invalidate
defer
presage

If you felt like none of the answers made any sense, it may be because you don’t know the other meaning of the word inform.

Inform doesn’t just mean “tell” — it can also mean “To give form or character to; imbue with a quality or an essence.”

Thus, it makes perfect sense to say, “so too does the experience of war inform her poetry.”

read the rest at the Manhattan Prep blog here!

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Every other Thursday, join MGRE instructor Jennifer Dziura for a FREE hour and a half study session.

In these special Live Online sessions, open to the public as well as current students, Jennifer will conduct mini workshops on a few different GRE-related topics.

If you can’t attend the session, don’t worry. A copy of the recording will be made available the following Monday.

On Thursday, April 5, Jen will focus on:
– Verbal: Vocab Intensive
– Verbal: Twisty Sentences
– Math: Variables in the Answer Choices

Sign up here!


via XKCD

To succeed at Argument Structure Passages on the GRE — short “Reading Comp” passages that are really logic problems — it helps to know a bit about the study of logic, because most mistakes in logic have been made many times before, even over thousands of years.

Think of it this way:
Two things happened at roughly the same time. Therefore, one of them caused the other one.

Now that we put it that way, it sounds a bit ridiculous, doesn’t it? (Just like in the cartoon!)

read this entire article on the Manhattan Prep GRE blog!

To give false appearance or impression

Example: “He feigned illness to avoid going to school.”

via GRE Vocabulary

Try this GRE question that hinges on hodgepodge:

While the author’s first collection of short stories presented a ________ hodgepodge of voices, the second collection presents a remarkably _________ set of tales presented by a ________ narrator.

motley insightful lonely
variegated even disingenuous
homogeneous facetious sole

This question is an excellent lesson in the principle, “Don’t add anything to your reading of the sentence that wasn’t there already.” What were we told? Just that the first short story collection had many diverse voices, and the second collection has “a ________ narrator” — in other words, just one speaker.

Therefore, we DON’T know that the stories or narrator are insightful, facetious, lonely, or disingenuous.

The answers are: motley, even, sole.

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Softening; something that softens.

via GRE Vocabulary

As the build-up to the election goes on (and on, and on, and on…), we are seeing more and more GRE vocabulary words popping up in the Republican debates!

Mitt Romney and Rick Santorum were both using the word feckless in the Arizona debate on February 22nd.

Feckless means “ineffective, incompetent, or futile” and can also mean “lazy.” The word is very negative, but because it isn’t used very often in everyday speech, Romney was able to use it to knock the President without outright calling him incompetent or lazy (harsher wording might have caused political backlash).

read the entire article on the Manhattan Prep GRE blog!

Tips for tackling the GRE from a tutor who has scored perfectly… twice!

via GradSchools.com

Every other Thursday, join MGRE instructor Jennifer Dziura for a FREE hour and a half study session.

In these special Live Online sessions, open to the public as well as current students, Jennifer will conduct mini workshops on a few different GRE-related topics.

If you can’t attend the session, don’t worry. A copy of the recording will be made available the following Monday.

On Thursday, March 22nd, Jen will focus on:
– Verbal: Vocab Intensive
– Verbal: Twisty Sentences
– Math: Variables in the Answer Choices

Sign up here!

Here’s a question I can’t seem to figure out…

Q1)16th% of 25?

Q2) Which of the following fraction is a terminating decimal?

a)19/91
b)17/225
c)12/231
d)41/256
e)35/324

Is there any other method to calculate terminating, rather than division?

JEN SAYS:

Do you want one-sixteenth of one percent of 25? If so, (1/16)(1/100)(25) will give you the answer.

The second one, I have a very good trick for! Think about what types of fractions terminate as decimals and what types don’t:

1/2 = 0.5 -> terminates
1/3 = 0.333333… -> doesn’t
1/4 = 0.25 -> terminates
1/5 = 0.2 -> terminates
1/6 = 0.16666… -> doesn’t

In short: if the denominator has only 2’s and/or 5’s in the denominator in fully reduced form, it’ll terminate. If not, it won’t.

Here are steps:
1) First, make sure you’ve fully reduced the fraction.
2) Make a prime tree for the denominator if needed. The numerator doesn’t matter (as long as it’s an integer).
3) If it’s only 2’s and/or 5’s, it’ll terminate. If not, it won’t.

Choice D) will terminate because 256 is just 2^8.